Ofgem update Targeted Charging Review timeline

Ofgem has published a letter to stakeholders to provide an update on timing and next steps on Future Charging and Access reforms. The regulator has three ongoing projects that serve as a review of transmission, distribution and balancing charging to help facilitate a transition to a more effective network. These are:

  • Electricity Network Access and Forward-looking Charging reform (Access reform)
    • A Significant Code Review (SCR) designed to develop improved access and forward-looking charging arrangements
    • A wide-ranging review of Distribution Use of System (DUoS) charges
    • A focused review of Transmission Network Use of System (TNUoS) charges
  • Targeted Charging Review (TCR)
    • A review of residual network charges, as well as some of the remaining Embedded Benefits to explore how costs may be more fairly shared amongst users
  • Balancing Services Charges Task Force
    • Designed to operate in parallel to the SCR and TCR, Ofgem have established an industry-led task force to evaluate Balancing Services Use of System (BSUoS) charges
    • The Task Force are evaluating how cost reflective and effective current BSUoS charges are

The new timeline

Ofgem have updated the timelines for the TCR and Access reform, providing clarity on dates in their original consultations.

The TCR consultation nominated April 2020 and April 2021 as potential dates for the reform of Embedded Benefits to come into effect. Ofgem have now ruled out April 2020, citing April 2021 as their preferred date. Options for the implementation date for new residual charging arrangements were April 2021 or phasing between 2021 and 2023. The regulator has indicated that they now consider April 2023 as a leading option, alongside the other two.

Regarding the Access reform, Ofgem originally scheduled changes to transmission charges to come into effect in April 2022, and changes to distribution arrangements in April 2023. This has now been revised to April 2023 for both changes.

Future Triad periods

Under the TCR proposals transmission demand residual charges (Triads) would be changed to a fixed or agreed capacity, avoiding the incentive for Triad avoidance in the future. The nomination of a potential implementation date of April 2023 for new residual charging arrangements increases the likelihood that the last Triad could be Winter 2022/23, totaling three Triad periods overall.

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Energy Policy Dates for 2019

As we look ahead to 2019, we’ve outlined key energy industry changes and dates to take action by.

EU ETS – Market Stability Reserve (MSR)

1 January – MSR Implementation

The European Commission is introducing a solution to the oversupply of allowances in the carbon market, which will take effect in January.

EU carbon allowances, or European Allowances (EUAs) serve as the unit of compliance under the European Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS). In response to a build-up of these allowances, following the 2008 global financial crisis, the European Commission has introduced a long-term solution known as the Market Stability Reserve (MSR). With Brexit looming, there’s uncertainty as to whether these changes will affect the UK.

 

Energy Price Cap

1 January – Price Cap implementation

Price protection for 11 million customers on poor value default tariffs will come into force on 1 January 2019. Ofgem has set the final level of the price cap at £1,136 per year for a typical dual fuel customer paying by direct debit.

When the price cap comes into force suppliers will have to cut the price of their default tariffs, including standard variable tariffs, to the level of or below the cap, forcing them to scrap excess charges. The cap will save customers who use a typical amount of gas and electricity around £76 per year on average, with customers on the most expensive tariffs saving about £120. In total, it is estimated that the price cap will save consumers in Great Britain around £1 billion. Read more here.

 

Ofgem’s Targeted Charging Review (TCR) – the end of Triad season?

4 February – Consultation conclusion

Ofgem has launched a consultation, due to conclude on 4 February 2019, into how the costs of transporting electricity to homes, public organisations, and businesses are recovered. Proposed changes could remove the incentive for Triad avoidance.

Costs for transporting electricity are currently recouped through two types of charges:

  • Forward-looking charges, which send signals to how costs will change with network usage
  • Residual charges, which recover the remainder of the costs

In order to ensure that these costs are shared fairly amongst all users of the electricity network, Ofgem are undertaking a review of the residual network charges, as well as some of the remaining Embedded Benefits, through the Targeted Charging Review (TCR). Ofgem are exploring the removal of the Embedded Benefit relating to charging suppliers for balancing services on the basis of gross demand at the relevant grid supply point. This is important as it would eliminate the incentive of Triad avoidance.

 

Brexit

29 March – Scheduled date to leave the EU

Whilst not a specific energy policy announcement, the UK’s departure from the EU is a significant event that has raised a lot of questions concerning UK energy security.

We put together a Q&A on how Brexit may impact the UK energy industry and climate change targets. Read more here.

 

Closure of the Feed-in Tariff (FiT) scheme

31 March – Scheme Closes

The Government has confirmed plans to remove the export tariff for solar power, which currently provides owners of solar PV panels revenue for excess energy that they generate. This will coincide with the closure of the Feed-in Tariff (FiT) scheme.

The FiT scheme was introduced in April 2010 in order to incentivise the development of small scale renewable generation from decentralised energy solutions such as solar photovoltaics (PV), wind, hydro, anaerobic digestion and micro Combined Heat and Power (CHP). Generators were paid a fixed rate determined by the Government, which varied by technology and scale.

The scheme will close in full to new applications from 31 March 2019, subject to the time-limited extensions and grace period.

 

Streamlined Energy and Carbon Reporting (SECR)

1 April – SECR implementation

Streamlined Energy and Carbon Reporting (SECR) is on the way, due to come in to effect from 1 April 2019. The introduction of this new carbon compliance scheme aims to reduce some of the administrative burden of overlapping schemes and improve the visibility of energy and carbon emissions when the CRC scheme ends.

EIC can help you achieve compliance. Read more about SECR in our blog, or visit our website.

 

UK Capacity Market

Early 2019

The UK Capacity Market is currently undergoing a temporary suspension, issued by the European Court of Justice (ECJ), on the back of a legal challenge that the auction was biased towards fossil fuel generators.

The ECJ’s decision means that payments made under the Capacity Market (CM) scheme will be frozen until the UK Government can obtain permission from the European Commission to continue. In addition, the UK will not be allowed to conduct any further CM auctions for energy firms to bid on new contracts.

The UK government has since iterated that it hopes to start the Capacity Market as soon as possible and intends to run a T-1 top-up auction next summer, for delivery in winter. This is dependent on the success of a formal investigation to be undertaken by the European Commission early in the New Year.

 

Spring Statement and Autumn Budget

The UK Government’s biannual financial updates are always worth looking out for.

The Spring Statement will be delivered in March and the more substantial Autumn Budget is scheduled for October. The 2018 budget had a very heavy focus on Brexit, with very little to say concerning energy policy. It is likely this will be the case for the Spring Statement and potentially going forward.

 

Energy Savings Opportunity Scheme (ESOS)

5 December – ESOS Phase 2 compliance deadline

ESOS provides a real chance to improve the energy efficiency of your business, on a continual basis, to make significant cost savings.

In Phase 1 of ESOS we identified 2,829 individual energy efficiency opportunities, equivalent to 461GWh or £43.9m of annual savings across 1,148 individual audits. Our team also helped over 300 ESOS Phase 1 clients avoid combined maximum penalties of over £48million.

With EIC you can achieve timely compliance and make the most of any recommendations identified in your ESOS report.

To find out how we can help, contact us on 01527 511 757, email esos@eic.co.uk, or visit our website.

 

Stay informed with EIC insights

Our Market Intelligence team keep a close eye on the energy markets and industry updates. For the most timely updates you can find us on Twitter and LinkedIn Follow us today.

Visit our website to find out more about EIC Market Intelligence and how we keep our clients informed at a frequency to suit them.

Will Ofgem’s Targeted Charging Review bring an end to Triads?

Ofgem has launched a consultation into how the costs of transporting electricity to homes, public organisations, and businesses are recovered. Proposed changes could remove the incentive for Triad avoidance.

Costs for transporting electricity are currently recouped through two types of charges:

  • Forward-looking charges, which send signals to how costs will change with network usage
  • Residual charges, which recover the remainder of the costs

In order to ensure that these costs are shared fairly amongst all users of the electricity network, Ofgem are undertaking a review of the residual network charges, as well as some of the remaining Embedded Benefits, through the Targeted Charging Review (TCR).

 

Proposed options for residual charges

On setting transmission and distribution residual charges, Ofgem has conducted an analysis of different approaches, leading them to two primary options that they are consulting on, the first of which is a ‘Fixed Charge’. This is highlighted as Ofgem’s preferred option, in which charges would be set for individuals in customer segments, with these segments being based on an existing industry approach.

The second option is an ‘Agreed Capacity Charge’. This would see a charge calculated directly for larger users who have a specific agreed capacity. Capacity for smaller households and businesses would be based upon assumed levels.

Ofgem’s assessment is that a reform of residual charges would result in potential net system benefits up to 2040 between £0.8bn and £3.2bn, with benefits to consumers as a whole in the range of £0.5bn to £1.6bn. In addition to this, Ofgem assess that the proposed changes would save around £2 a year for households in the longer term.

Either scenario would see a fixed rate for Transmission Network Use of System (TNUoS) charges. However, under the Agreed Capacity Charge option, as charges would be based on capacity, there would potentially be some room to reduce contribution to the residual charges.

 

Changes to Embedded Benefits

There are a some notable points within the TCR regarding Embedded Benefits; notably, Ofgem are consulting on setting the Transmission Generation Residual to zero, subject to maintaining compliance with the current cap on overall transmission charges to generators. This will remove a benefit to larger generators that receive a credit from these charges at present.

Another key point is that Ofgem are exploring the removal of the Embedded Benefit relating to charging suppliers for balancing services on the basis of gross demand at the relevant grid supply point. This is important as it would eliminate the incentive of Triad avoidance. Currently, National Grid identifies three Triads each year in order to calculate the TNUoS charges an organisation will incur. Such transmission costs can be reduced if demand is decreased when a Triad Alert is called (a warning that demand will be high that day). Find out more about what Triads are and how you can avoid them here.

For both of these points, Ofgem believes that whilst these benefits reduce costs for individual companies or consumers, they don’t reduce the total network costs that users need to fund collectively. This can lead to greater costs for other users and, if not addressed, Ofgem say this will lead to less efficient outcomes that are not in the best interests of consumers as a whole.

 

BSUoS changes

The Review outlines a proposal for Ofgem to set up a Balancing Services Use of System (BSUoS) task force. The task force would be responsible for considering how cost-reflective and effective the current charges within BSUoS are. From this, they would evaluate the potential to provide a better system in the future, looking to make it more cost-effective. This would come with the responsibility of assessing how feasible any improvements to BSUoS charges are.

Ofgem are deliberating between two reform options; a partial or a full reform of BSUoS. A partial reform would see a reduction in suppliers’ contributions to BSUoS charges, while a full reform would see the removal of BSUoS payments, and require smaller embedded generators to pay BSUoS charges.

Under the current system, suppliers are charged BSUoS based on net demand. A bill is calculated on gross demand and then any embedded generation reduces this cost to the supplier, which is recouped from consumers via a separate non-commodity cost (NCC) charge. Under the proposed full reform, embedded generators would be considered the same as transmission connected generators, leading them to be charged for BSUoS with no savings.

 

The impact to Triads

Triads are currently evaluated based on average demand during the three highest half-hourly peaks of electricity use between November and February. These periods can be forecast, allowing network users who employ Triad avoidance to reduce their electricity consumption in anticipation, for example by instead using on-site generation, Demand Side Response (DSR), or storage. Ofgem argue that whilst this reduces their own costs, the total network cost doesn’t change, meaning that those unable to employ the same avoidance methods pay a larger cost.

Under the proposals by Ofgem, charges will remain roughly the same to users where no Triad management is in place. However, it is expected that large increases will occur for those who use Triad avoidance to reduce the impact.

The new system would see single fixed charges applied based on voltage level. Ofgem believe this will result in reductions in charges for larger SMEs, whilst SMEs at the lower end of consumption will see moderate increases. Importantly, users with on-site generation will pay the same charge as those without, in contrast to the current arrangements.

The Triad period this winter will be unaffected, as will winter 2019 going by Ofgem’s timetable. However, this will have a significant impact on how businesses may seek to recover operating costs in the future. No replacement could see a lack of incentive for DSR, resulting in adverse constraints on the market.

 

Stay informed with EIC insights

Our Market Intelligence team keep a close eye on the energy markets and industry updates. For the most timely updates you can find us on Twitter and LinkedIn Follow us today.

Visit our website to find out more about EIC Market Intelligence and how we keep our clients informed at a frequency to suit them.