Wednesday August 11, 2021

The Smart Export Guarantee (SEG) came into effect on 1st January 2020, replacing the Feed-in Tariff (FiT). These schemes offered payments to businesses with installed onsite generation, a vital part of the UK’s journey to net zero.

Onsite generation can offer businesses various benefits, including self-sufficiency and environmental sustainability – and as the technology becomes less expensive and more efficient, the advantages will only increase. While these green solutions are not suitable for every business, they are becoming more prevalent in this time of economic recovery.

Here are some FAQs regarding the new scheme and how it works:

What is the Smart Export Guarantee (SEG)?

The SEG offers payment to small-scale renewable energy generators for excess electricity that is exported to the National Grid. To do this, suppliers with at least 150,000 domestic customers will be required to provide a minimum of one tariff offer to small-scale low-carbon generators.

Do I need to apply for the Smart Export Guarantee?

If you are a small-scale energy generator with either solar PV, wind, CHP, Hydro, or Anaerobic digestion, installed in England, Scotland or Wales with a capacity up to 5MW (or up to 50kW for micro-CHP), you may fit the criteria for the SEG.

For next steps and more info download our SEG Guide

What if I already get the Feed-in Tariff (FiT)?

If you signed up for FiT before the 31 March 2019 deadline, your payments will continue until your contract runs out. The SEG is mostly for companies or households with new renewable energy installations, or for those who missed the FiT deadline.

There is no FiT subsidy for newly installed renewable energy technologies after this date. Backdated applications will also not be accepted.

What is the difference between SEG and FiT?

Whilst the SEG is replacing the Feed-in Tariff, there are differences between the two schemes. The Feed-in Tariff included both export and generation tariffs, but the SEG only provides the former. In other words, with the SEG you will only receive tariffs for the renewable energy you don’t use. This means that customers may not see the same financial benefit for the renewable energy they are generating as solar panel owners initially did with FiT. (Tariffs will vary across regions depending on network requirements.)

There is also a scheme for renewable heat technologies for both domestic and non-domestic purposes, known as the RHI and non-domestic RHI. This government scheme provides financial incentives for the installation of renewable heat technologies. Eligible technologies include biomass heat, solar thermal and heat pumps.

How do I know if on-site generation is right for my business?

On-site generation can often provide energy security: a worthwhile commodity in a volatile market. It can also help businesses avoid non-commodity costs, which can make up almost 60% of your energy bills.

At EIC, we already support our clients with initiatives that incentivise clean energy use, assisting clients with navigating the transition to a net zero landscape. We can help guide you towards the most efficient and cost-effective energy management plan. This can mean exploring on-site generation options, as well as other sustainable solutions that can reduce your carbon emissions and energy costs.

For businesses that have set or plan on committing to a net zero target, EIC would be happy to engage with you. Our carbon team works with businesses to put together an adaptable and bespoke roadmap, outlining the sustainable steps required to reduce your carbon footprint. Along the way, we will ensure you stay compliant with changing legislation, allowing you to make the most of schemes such as the SEG.

To understand more about our energy and carbon services contact us at EIC.

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