Mandatory display of annual energy certificates to be extended

In a new scheme proposed by the government, all larger commercial and industrial buildings will be mandated to display annual energy certificates. This will initially affect offices over 1,000m2of which there are approximately 10,000 in England and Wales. However, the proposal includes plans to extend to more varied sites in the future, including smaller buildings. So, why the change and how might it impact businesses in the UK?

What does the proposal include?

Currently, large commercial buildings are required to display an Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) only if their total useful floor area is over 500 square metres, is frequently visited by the public, and an EPC has already been produced for the building’s sale, rental or construction. EPCs measure the building emission rate (kgCO2/m² per year) and primary energy use (kWh/m² per year) for the core HVAC and building fabric assets.

EPCs are valid for 10 years, once an EPC reaches the ten year point and expires, there is no automatic requirement to produce a new one. A further EPC will only be required when the property is next sold, let or modified.

In October 2019, the Government told the Climate Change Committee that it would consult on introducing a new scheme that would rate commercial and industrial buildings based on their actual energy consumption and carbon emissions.

As a result of this, the government launched a new consultation called ‘Introducing a Performance-Based Policy Framework in large Commercial and Industrial Buildings in England and Wales’. This is the first step towards introducing a national performance-based policy framework that aims to reduce energy consumption and emissions.

How does this differ from DECs?

A Display Energy Certificate (DEC) rates public sector buildings over 250m2 based on actual energy consumption, so why not simply expand this to commercial buildings? According to the proposal, the new rating framework will look to modernise and go beyond what (DECs) currently offer.

Why the change?

Larger office buildings use over 53% of the energy used by all commercial and industrial buildings. This means that more frequent audits and stricter oversight will help to root out waste and reduce overall consumption. Success from similar policies has already been seen in countries like Australia who reduced consumption by 34% in 10 years with the National Australian Built Environment Rating System.

In this global push for energy efficiency and retrofitting, the UK is falling behind. Since 2016, similar requirements have been mandatory in all non-residential buildings over 500m2 throughout the European Union.

What are the benefits of the proposal?

Mandating more frequent energy evaluations will help to identify areas of inefficiency or, at the very least, raise awareness around energy consumption. While retrofitting the UK’s predominantly old building stock is a daunting task, the benefits could be enormous. This initiative alone is predicted to save British businesses over £1 billion annually and reduce carbon emissions by 8m tonnes when completed.

The Government is also considering including waste, water usage and air quality standards. None of these are currently required for either EPCs or DECs, and could lead to further cost savings for businesses.

How can EIC help?

The government plans to introduce the new rating system in 3 phases over the 2020s. The 1st phase is aimed at the office sector and has been planned to start in April 2022. EIC helps its clients stay informed and prepared for policy shifts such as these. In a net zero economy, staying ahead of the curve will be crucial to business resilience and growth.

As emission reduction targets become more important, energy reporting will become an essential part of managing a successful business or property. EIC can help you stay compliant with fast-changing legislation by streamlining and simplifying any and all of your energy admin. Our energy specialists have extensive experience with EPBD requirements including DECs, EPC and TM44 certification. We can go beyond mandatory reporting and certification to ensure you are as sustainable and energy-efficient as possible.

EIC can help you stay ahead of the curve. To find out more contact us today.

Simplifying Display Energy Certificates

EIC discusses the purpose behind DECs, the benefits they offer and how the EIC carbon team can help you secure one.

What is a DEC?

Display Energy Certificates (DEC) have been a required document in public buildings since 2012. While some structures are exempt, those with floor space of less than 250m2, larger buildings fitting certain criteria must comply. These are properties that are occupied by a public authority and frequently visited by the public.

The certificate summarises the energy performance of the building based on criteria known to affect energy demand and usage. These criteria include the type of building under assessment, its total floor area and fuel use.

Accreditors then measure this data against specific benchmarks to determine the building’s overall energy performance. Newer buildings are more likely to have consolidated record-keeping on a building and their HVAC. However, older properties may need to collate this data from various departments and archives.

Since data might be stored in a multitude of locations and formats, this process can be complex and time-consuming. However, the more intelligence that can be sought, the more valuable the DEC becomes in its ability to help identify sources of energy waste.

Looking at trees through glasses held away from faceWhat are the benefits?

The primary benefit of a DEC is to provide a litmus test for the current energy efficiency of a building. This data can then guide improvement strategies for the structure’s utility usage, thereby reducing their demand and subsequent cost. Only accredited assessors are qualified to analyse and deliver DECs. Part of their service is identifying opportunities for improvement and providing guidance on how to implement these improvements as well.

DECs also communicate your commitment to carbon reduction to visitors, due to the requirement to display them prominently. As consumers become more aware of the effect of their spending habits on the environment, it will dictate the businesses they are willing to interact with. A DEC demonstrates dedication to reduce to or maintain an efficient rating for the building.

Do you need a DEC?

If you are a public authority receiving frequent public visitation, with usable floor space in excess of 250m2, then you will need to display a DEC. The validity period of these certificates does vary depending on building size. The DEC of buildings between 250m2 -1000m2  remains valid for 10 years. However, buildings larger than 1000m2 must renew every year.

Those in need of a DEC or those looking to renew would benefit from shopping around. Ideally looking for a compliance specialist that can offer them the most value with their service.

EIC offers an end-to-end DEC acquisition, starting with a comprehensive site survey if a lack of available data necessitates it. A copy of the accreditation documents will be forwarded to your organisation once the process is complete.

The EIC team pride themselves on providing relief from the complex process of accreditation, allowing business leaders to focus on their own clients and services. To date, EIC has produced over 5,000 DECs and currently manages the renewal process for over 600 sites.

Each of EIC’s EPBD delivery team, have worked within the schemes since their inception, thereby bringing trusted and reliable expertise to your project.

The EIC carbon team provides various compliance services including major carbon-legislative guidance and all EPBD services (EPCs, DECs, TM44). Since these accreditations work in tandem, and share data sets, getting them under one roof can save you some time. While each of these carbon services can be found on EIC’s trusted compliance page, those seeking the DEC offering specifically can find it here.