Energy Policy Dates for 2019

As we look ahead to 2019, we’ve outlined key energy industry changes and dates to take action by.

EU ETS – Market Stability Reserve (MSR)

1 January – MSR Implementation

The European Commission is introducing a solution to the oversupply of allowances in the carbon market, which will take effect in January.

EU carbon allowances, or European Allowances (EUAs) serve as the unit of compliance under the European Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS). In response to a build-up of these allowances, following the 2008 global financial crisis, the European Commission has introduced a long-term solution known as the Market Stability Reserve (MSR). With Brexit looming, there’s uncertainty as to whether these changes will affect the UK.

 

Energy Price Cap

1 January – Price Cap implementation

Price protection for 11 million customers on poor value default tariffs will come into force on 1 January 2019. Ofgem has set the final level of the price cap at £1,136 per year for a typical dual fuel customer paying by direct debit.

When the price cap comes into force suppliers will have to cut the price of their default tariffs, including standard variable tariffs, to the level of or below the cap, forcing them to scrap excess charges. The cap will save customers who use a typical amount of gas and electricity around £76 per year on average, with customers on the most expensive tariffs saving about £120. In total, it is estimated that the price cap will save consumers in Great Britain around £1 billion. Read more here.

 

Ofgem’s Targeted Charging Review (TCR) – the end of Triad season?

4 February – Consultation conclusion

Ofgem has launched a consultation, due to conclude on 4 February 2019, into how the costs of transporting electricity to homes, public organisations, and businesses are recovered. Proposed changes could remove the incentive for Triad avoidance.

Costs for transporting electricity are currently recouped through two types of charges:

  • Forward-looking charges, which send signals to how costs will change with network usage
  • Residual charges, which recover the remainder of the costs

In order to ensure that these costs are shared fairly amongst all users of the electricity network, Ofgem are undertaking a review of the residual network charges, as well as some of the remaining Embedded Benefits, through the Targeted Charging Review (TCR). Ofgem are exploring the removal of the Embedded Benefit relating to charging suppliers for balancing services on the basis of gross demand at the relevant grid supply point. This is important as it would eliminate the incentive of Triad avoidance.

 

Brexit

29 March – Scheduled date to leave the EU

Whilst not a specific energy policy announcement, the UK’s departure from the EU is a significant event that has raised a lot of questions concerning UK energy security.

We put together a Q&A on how Brexit may impact the UK energy industry and climate change targets. Read more here.

 

Closure of the Feed-in Tariff (FiT) scheme

31 March – Scheme Closes

The Government has confirmed plans to remove the export tariff for solar power, which currently provides owners of solar PV panels revenue for excess energy that they generate. This will coincide with the closure of the Feed-in Tariff (FiT) scheme.

The FiT scheme was introduced in April 2010 in order to incentivise the development of small scale renewable generation from decentralised energy solutions such as solar photovoltaics (PV), wind, hydro, anaerobic digestion and micro Combined Heat and Power (CHP). Generators were paid a fixed rate determined by the Government, which varied by technology and scale.

The scheme will close in full to new applications from 31 March 2019, subject to the time-limited extensions and grace period.

 

Streamlined Energy and Carbon Reporting (SECR)

1 April – SECR implementation

Streamlined Energy and Carbon Reporting (SECR) is on the way, due to come in to effect from 1 April 2019. The introduction of this new carbon compliance scheme aims to reduce some of the administrative burden of overlapping schemes and improve the visibility of energy and carbon emissions when the CRC scheme ends.

EIC can help you achieve compliance. Read more about SECR in our blog, or visit our website.

 

UK Capacity Market

Early 2019

The UK Capacity Market is currently undergoing a temporary suspension, issued by the European Court of Justice (ECJ), on the back of a legal challenge that the auction was biased towards fossil fuel generators.

The ECJ’s decision means that payments made under the Capacity Market (CM) scheme will be frozen until the UK Government can obtain permission from the European Commission to continue. In addition, the UK will not be allowed to conduct any further CM auctions for energy firms to bid on new contracts.

The UK government has since iterated that it hopes to start the Capacity Market as soon as possible and intends to run a T-1 top-up auction next summer, for delivery in winter. This is dependent on the success of a formal investigation to be undertaken by the European Commission early in the New Year.

 

Spring Statement and Autumn Budget

The UK Government’s biannual financial updates are always worth looking out for.

The Spring Statement will be delivered in March and the more substantial Autumn Budget is scheduled for October. The 2018 budget had a very heavy focus on Brexit, with very little to say concerning energy policy. It is likely this will be the case for the Spring Statement and potentially going forward.

 

Energy Savings Opportunity Scheme (ESOS)

5 December – ESOS Phase 2 compliance deadline

ESOS provides a real chance to improve the energy efficiency of your business, on a continual basis, to make significant cost savings.

In Phase 1 of ESOS we identified 2,829 individual energy efficiency opportunities, equivalent to 461GWh or £43.9m of annual savings across 1,148 individual audits. Our team also helped over 300 ESOS Phase 1 clients avoid combined maximum penalties of over £48million.

With EIC you can achieve timely compliance and make the most of any recommendations identified in your ESOS report.

To find out how we can help, contact us on 01527 511 757, email esos@eic.co.uk, or visit our website.

 

Stay informed with EIC insights

Our Market Intelligence team keep a close eye on the energy markets and industry updates. For the most timely updates you can find us on Twitter and LinkedIn Follow us today.

Visit our website to find out more about EIC Market Intelligence and how we keep our clients informed at a frequency to suit them.

EU temporarily suspend UK carbon permit processes

EU temporarily suspend UK carbon permit processes

The European Commission has implemented a “no-deal” Contingency Action Plan across specific sectors to help mitigate the continued uncertainty in the UK surrounding the ratification of the Withdrawal Agreement.

The main talking point, regarding energy policy, is the Commission’s plans for the UK’s access to the EU Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS).

EU carbon allowances, or European Allowances (EUAs) serve as the unit of compliance under the EU ETS. EUAs are auctioned for use by energy-intensive industries that fall under the scheme, namely power generators, oil refiners, and steel companies, entitling them to emit one tonne of CO2.

How this affects the EU ETS in the UK

The Commission has adopted a number of actions in the area of EU climate legislation to “ensure that a “no-deal” scenario does not affect the smooth functioning and the environmental integrity of the Emissions Trading System.”

This involves a decision to temporarily suspend the free allocation of emissions allowances, auctioning, and the exchange of international credits for the UK effective from 1 January 2019.

The Commission has also elected to allow an appropriate annual quota allocation to UK companies for accessing the EU27 market, until 31 December 2020. This will be supplemented through regulation to ensure that the reporting by companies differentiates between the EU market and the UK market to allow a correct allocation of quotas in the future.

The full Contingency Action Plan can be read here.

Stay informed with EIC insights

Our Market Intelligence team keep a close eye on the energy markets and industry updates. For the most timely updates you can find us on Twitter and LinkedIn Follow us today.

Visit our website to find out more about EIC Market Intelligence and how we keep our clients informed at a frequency to suit them.

Update on EU ETS

The Government has directed the Environment Agency (EA) to proceed with preparations for the next phase of emissions trading which will operate from 2021 – 2030. Due to ongoing Brexit negotiations the full detail of the future scheme is not yet known. However, one thing we do know is that NIMs will take effect from January.

In preparation for future reporting, the EA has notified participants in EU Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) Phase 3 that the data collection exercise, National Implementation Measures (NIMs), will take place between January 2019 and September 2019.

 

What is the EU ETS?

The European Union Emissions Trading Scheme started in 2005 and is the world’s largest carbon-trading scheme. It was introduced to help the EU meet its targets under the Kyoto Protocol which stipulates an 8% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from 1990 levels. Organisations that meet the qualification criteria – typically large combustion sector and manufacturing processes – are obligated to take part.

The scheme works on a ‘cap and trade’ basis, so there is a ‘cap’ or limit set on the total greenhouse gas emissions allowed by all participants. This cap is converted into tradable emission allowances and provides an incentive for installations to reduce their carbon emissions, giving them the opportunity to sell their surplus allowances.

Participants in the carbon market are allocated traded emissions allowances via a mixture of free allocation and auctions. For each one allowance, the holder has the right to emit one tonne of CO2 (or its equivalent). Those covered by the EU ETS must monitor and report their emissions each year and surrender enough allowances to cover their annual emissions.

 

What are NIMs?

There is a requirement to benchmark participants in the ETS to ensure a fair and equitable distribution of free carbon allowances. The NIMs is a method of benchmarking the emissions of participating installations.

The NIMs data collection requires gathering energy or production data over four years (2014 – 2018), which must be collated, verified by an approved body, and submitted by 31 May 2019.

 

EIC is here to help

We’re experienced in managing EU ETS compliance across a broad range of sites and industries. We’ve also worked with the Environment Agency in the delivery of legislative compliance across all carbon schemes and systems, including ESOS.

We can assist with your EU ETS and NIMs requirements; we’ll review the data held on record and complete the necessary submission to your appointed verifier and the verified data to the Environment Agency. We would also deal with any correspondence between the verifier, Environment Agency, and your organisation.

To find out more about NIMS, download our factsheet here or email info@eic.co.uk.