Net Zero UK

The action will require the UK to reduce net greenhouse gas emissions to nothing over the next 30 years. This is a more ambitious target than the previous, which was at least an 80% reduction from 1990 levels.

The decision follows the Net Zero report, by the Committee on Climate Change (CCC), which was commissioned by the government to reassess the UK’s long-term emissions targets. The report recommended the 2050 net zero target for the UK, while issuing a 2045 target for Scotland and a 95% reduction in greenhouse gases by 2050 for Wales.

Representatives of the Scottish and Welsh governments have already announced intentions for the nations to aim for these targets, with the Welsh government aiming to go further than the CCC advice; targeting net zero emissions no later than 2050.

Is this achievable?

The report by the Committee on Climate Change states that the net zero target is possible with known technologies, alongside behavioral and societal changes in people’s lives. The organisation has forecast that that the target is also within the expected economic cost that Parliament accepted when legislating the previous 2050 target under the Paris Agreement.

The report does come with the caveat that net zero is only possible if clear, sensible and well-designed policies to enable reductions in emissions are introduced across the country in a strict timeline. The CCC highlights that current policy would not meet even the previous target.

STAY INFORMED WITH EIC INSIGHTS

Our Market Intelligence team keep a close eye on the energy markets and industry updates. For the most timely updates you can find us on Twitter and LinkedIn Follow us today.

Visit our webpage to find out more about EIC Market Intelligence and how we keep our clients informed at a frequency to suit them.

An update on Smart Export Guarantee

The Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) has published a response to their consultation on the future for small-scale low-carbon generation, which sought views on policy proposals for a Smart Export Guarantee (SEG).

The SEG will require suppliers with at least 150,000 domestic customers to provide a minimum of one tariff offer to small-scale low-carbon generators. Exporters of up to 5MW capacity of anaerobic digestion, hydro, micro-combined heat and power, onshore wind, and solar photovoltaics are eligible for payment.

It is the government’s opinion that small-scale low-carbon electricity generation should be supported by competitive, market-based solutions. To this effect, the government will not specify a minimum tariff rate in order to allow the market to develop. However, a supplier must provide payment greater than zero at all times of export.

The SEG is a replacement for the Feed-in Tariff (FiT), which closed to new generators in March 2019. The Feed-in Tariff scheme was originally introduced in April 2010 in order to incentivise the development of small-scale renewable generation from decentralised energy solutions. Generators were paid a fixed rate determined by the Government, which varied by technology and scale.

How will this impact you?

All suppliers that meet the SEG criteria will be required to offer at least one tariff by an expected date of 31 December 2019, providing small-scale generators with a choice of who they want to export to.

Currently, there are very few suppliers that offer tariffs of this nature. However, as the deadline approaches it can be expected that all larger suppliers will begin to offer their own options, allowing generators to choose the best tariff for themselves.

Stay informed with EIC insights

Our Market Intelligence team keep a close eye on the energy markets and industry updates. For the most timely updates you can find us on Twitter and LinkedIn Follow us today.

Visit our webpage to find out more about EIC Market Intelligence and how we keep our clients informed at a frequency to suit them.

An insight into SECR

SECR will require all quoted companies, large UK incorporated unquoted companies, and limited liability partnerships (LLPs) to report their energy use and carbon emissions relating to gas, electricity, and transport, and apply an intensity metric, through their annual Directors’ reports.

 

Summary of the Government’s proposed SECR framework

From April next year, large organisations in the UK will need to comply with the SECR regulations. The new scheme is part of the Government’s reform package.

Its aim is to reduce some of the administrative burden of overlapping carbon schemes and improve visibility of energy and carbon emissions. As such, it will be introduced to coincide with the end of the current Carbon Reduction Commitment (CRC) Energy Efficiency Scheme.

SECR will build on the existing mandatory reporting of greenhouse gas emissions by UK quoted companies and the Energy Savings Opportunity Scheme (ESOS).

 

Who needs to comply with SECR?

SECR qualification will follow the Companies Act 2006 definition of a ‘large organisation’, where two or more of the following criteria apply to a company within a financial year:

  • More than 250 employees.
  • Annual turnover greater than £36m.
  • Annual balance sheet total greater than £18m.

There is no exemption for involvement for energy used in other schemes – e.g. Climate Change Agreements (CCAs) or EU Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS).

 

What are the reporting requirements?

From 1 April 2019, affected organisations will be required to:

  • Make a public disclosure within their annual directors’ report of energy use and carbon emissions.
  • Report using a relative intensity metric e.g. tCO2/number of employees.
  • Provide a narrative on energy efficiency actions taken during the reporting period.

Reporting will align with an organisation’s financial reporting year.

 

Is anyone exempt from SECR?

Yes – those exempt from complying with SECR include:

  • Public sector organisations.
  • Organisations consuming less than 40,000kWh in the 12-month period are not required to disclose SECR information.
  • Unquoted companies where it would not be practical to obtain some or all of the SECR information.
  • Disclosure of information which Directors think would be seriously prejudicial to interests of the company.

 

There seem to be similarities to ESOS – can ESOS compliance help with SECR?

Yes. Though ESOS and SECR are separate schemes, and will continue as such, the information from your ESOS compliance can be used to support SECR reporting.

 

Where do I start with compliance?

The detailed guidance for SECR will soon be published. EIC can assist with compliance as well as providing bespoke reporting to ensure that you have real visibility of your energy and carbon emissions both at organisational and site level.

If you would like to know more about SECR, what it means for your business, and how EIC can support you with compliance contact us on 01527 511 757 or email SECR@eic.co.uk.

The role of renewables this winter

The increase in wind and solar capacity in recent years has contributed to the overall reduction in demand. Higher volumes of on-site renewable capacity allow more generation to be provided off-grid, as homes and businesses generate their own electricity supply during windy or sunny spells.

This reduces demand on the national transmission system. The high levels of solar availability during the summer season were a particularly strong influence on demand levels this year, as on-site solar panels increased embedded generation, reducing demand requirements for the transmission network.

During stormy weather conditions, installed wind capacity can now provide around 12GW of electricity to the grid. Average wind generation in the UK last month was 5.3GW a day; over 50% higher than in September 2017.

 

average wind

 

What happens when there’s no wind?

While high winds can reduce power demand, one of the biggest dangers to the National Grid electricity network is a high-demand scenario at a time when wind output is very low. Lighting has a bigger impact on electricity demand than heating, as the majority of home heating is gas-fired.

However, during severe cold periods, electricity demand does spike as additional electric heating is needed to cope with the very low temperatures. This scenario occurred during March as a result of the Beast from the East, when peak demand jumped around 10% as temperatures dropped. The cold snap also brought very high winds to the UK. Wind output at the time topped 10GW, which provided high levels of low-cost electricity to the grid. However, this renewable supply may not be available during another cold spell.

National Grid’s Winter Outlook report forecasts an electricity margin this winter of 7GW, while also expecting 7GW of wind output during the peak winter. Find out more here.

 

How could this impact energy bills?

Supply margins would be placed under significantly more stress during a similar cold snap this winter, if wind output was low or non-existent. This would require another 10GW of supply being provided by gas and coal plant or imports. Such a scenario is likely to require significant price rises in the Within-day and Day-ahead markets.

 

Renewable energy solutions with EIC

If you’re interested in generating energy from your own renewables sources we can support your business to implement solar at your site.

A cost-effective and sustainable energy source, generating power from solar panels will cut your emissions, help the environment, and can be linked with a battery storage solution to maximise ROI. With our support you can install a battery solution as part of your wider energy strategy. Batteries can work in tandem with renewable energy sources such as solar or wind and can help you generate additional revenue via potentially lucrative demand side response (DSR) schemes.

To find out more, call us on 01527 511 757 or email info@eic.co.uk.

Triads – how low can they go?

The Triad season started on 1 November and is one of the most important areas of demand management for energy users. Triads are used by National Grid to calculate transmission charges as part of the Transmission Network Use of System (TNUoS) scheme.

What are Triads?

Triads are the three half-hour periods with the highest demand between 1 November and the end of February, identified by National Grid. However, each Triad must be separated by at least 10 clear days, meaning consecutive days of high demand won’t result in multiple Triads.

 

Why should you avoid them?

The knowledge of when Triads will occur enables many companies to manage their demand consumption. If your electricity contract allows for it, reducing your usage during an expected Triad period will result in reduced transmission charges and lower bills.

 

How low can they go?

The 2017/18 season saw the lowest level of Triad demand since records began in the early 1990s.

The maximum Triad level dropped to a record 48GW last year, having fallen more than 10GW in just eight years.

 

How low can Triads go

 

Overall energy consumption has been trending lower for the last decade, and one of the interesting outcomes from this Triad season will be whether a new record low can be achieved.

 

Efficiency is key

A large part of the reduction in peak demand has been due to major developments in energy efficiency. The use of new technology and appliances, as well as a switch from incandescent lighting, are all contributing to lower energy consumption.

The act of Triad avoidance has developed to the extent that it’s influencing when Triads occur, as more and more businesses across the UK look to demand side management as a means to cut their costs. National Grid highlighted last year that businesses reacting to warning signals – such as our Triad Alerts – had the potential to cut the country’s peak demand by as much as 2GW. This then makes it more difficult to predict Triads, as peaks for the winter get lower and flatter with each passing year, forcing us to adapt our model to ensure continued success.

 

Our successful track record

Forecasting Triads is dependent on a wide range of different factors. Our Triad Alert service monitors different influencers to predict the likelihood of any particular day being a Triad and automatically sends that information promptly to our clients. These businesses can then take informed action to avoid high energy usage during these more costly half-hour periods, while minimising disruption to their everyday activity. Our daily report can help you plan ahead with an overview of the next 14 days, alongside a long-term winter outlook.

Of course, calling an alert every weekday would generate a 100% success rate, but we recognise the negative impact this would have on businesses. Organisations could incur major damage to revenues if required to turn down their production each day for four months ‘just in case’, so we aim to provide as few alerts as possible.

In the previous Triad season we only called 9 Red Alerts and successfully predicted all three Triads with fewer alerts than any other tracked TPI or supplier. In fact, the total number of alerts called by Utilitywise has fallen 36% in the last three years. We successfully predicted all three half hour periods with our lowest ever number of alerts. Our in-house model is based on a traffic light system, with Red Alerts indicating we believe a Triad is highly likely and our clients should take immediate action.

For those that took action last year, based on our advice, demand was cut by an average of 14% compared to standard winter peak-period half-hour consumption. This resulted in significant average cost savings of over £30,000, and in some cases, rewards closer to £700,000 were observed.

 

Intelligent buildings, smarter business

By forecasting when Triads will occur, we empower our clients to take control of their consumption to reduce their energy use and lower their bills. Businesses can react to our Alerts simply by cutting demand during suspected Triad times or by load-shifting.

Load-shifting involves moving the most energy-intensive tasks of the day to a time when it’s less likely that a Triad will occur, for example early in the morning. This enables you to avoid Triads without reducing your overall daily energy use. Building controls make this easier. With our IoT-enabled Building Energy Management solution, we’re introducing the next generation of smart building controls. Our innovative solution brings together the required technologies to integrate your critical energy systems with a single, remotely-managed platform. This means you can manage your buildings in real-time.

The Triad season started on 1 November. To find out more about our Triad Alert service visit our website, call 01527 511 757 or email info@eic.co.uk.

How ESOS can help you get ahead with SECR

You probably know all about ESOS, and you may feel that even now, with 15 months until the next deadline, there’s still no rush to get started with Phase 2. We disagree. Rather than put off compliance until the bitter end, we recommend getting ahead of the curve to avoid any bottleneck in resources later on.

The ESOS Phase 2 compliance deadline is 5 December 2019, however, the qualification date is 31 December this year. This means that if you know your business will fit the criteria, you can start some compliance activities now.

ESOS applies to large organisations, classified as those with:

  • More than 250 employees or;
  • A turnover of more than €50,000,000 and an annual balance sheet total of more than €43,000,000 or;
  • Part of a corporate group containing a large enterprise.

 

It’s time to get started

In their latest ESOS newsletter, the Environment Agency (EA) emphasised that businesses can start audit work now. They state that although you won’t be able to complete the assessment of your Total Energy Consumption (TEC), as this has to include the qualification date, if you expect to qualify for Phase 2 – and you know that an energy supply will be included in your Significant Energy Consumption (SEC) – you can do the audit work on this supply.

This audit will need to have at least one-year’s energy measurement, but this can be from anytime between 6 December 2015 and 5 December 2019. The audit can use data that has been collected at any time during this period provided that it is carried out no later than 24 months after the data period (and the data has not already been used for an audit in Phase 1).

 

SECR is coming – ESOS can help get you ready

Streamlined Energy and Carbon Reporting (SECR) aims to further incentivise the improvement of energy efficiency and reduction of carbon emissions. It’s also hoped that SECR will reduce some of the administrative burden of overlapping carbon schemes. As such, it’ll be introduced from April 2019 to coincide with the end of the current CRC Energy Efficiency Scheme.

Taking action with ESOS compliance will help you get a head start with preparing for SECR compliance. Though ESOS and SECR are separate schemes, and will continue as such, you can use information from your ESOS compliance to support energy and emissions reporting and narrative on energy efficiency action taken in your annual reports.

 

Make EIC your trusted compliance partner

Whether it’s ESOS, SECR, or CCA, EIC will work with you to reach compliance deadlines and targets. In Phase 1 of ESOS we identified a total of 527GWh worth of energy savings for our clients, equivalent to £49,000,000 in cost savings.

With just 15 months until the next ESOS deadline, we’re urging you to make a start with compliance. To find out more about how we can help you comply, call us on 01527 511 757, email esos@eic.co.uk, or visit our website.

Britain running on sunshine as summer demand falls

The changes have come from an evolution in how energy is being used, and those who successfully manage these demand patterns, particularly if combined with Demand Side Response (DSR), could see significant cost savings.

Analysis from EIC has shown that maximum summer demand (seen between May and August) has fallen 17% in the last decade. From a peak of 44GW in 2012, maximum consumption for the current summer has fallen to just 35GW.

This near 10GW loss in demand is similar to the reduction seen during the winter. Furthermore, it’s not only peak consumption that’s been reduced but baseload generation. Minimum summer demand has fallen by 19% since 2009. How much of this is down to efficiency improvements or consumption moving behind the meter is unclear. However, the change does mean National Grid has nearly 10GW less electricity demand to manage on its transmission network.

 

maximum summer demand

 

The trend can be seen more clearly when broken down by month. Average peak demand during May 2012 was over 39GW. This year that figure was just 31.5GW, a reduction of over 7GW in only six years.

 

maximum demand per month

 

Improving energy efficiency

The cost of LED lighting halved between 2011 and 2013. During this time, consumers switching towards the more efficient bulbs helped facilitate a strong drop in demand. This could be helped further with news that the EU will ban the use of halogen lightbulbs from 1 September 2018.

Another major explanation for the demand drop, aside from efficiency improvements in appliances and lighting, is the significant growth in small-scale on-site solar capacity over the same period. Small-scale distribution connected solar has a capacity of under 4KW but the number of installations has grown from under 30,000 in 2010 to nearly 900,000 in 2018. An increase of almost 2,900%.

The total capacity of the small-scale solar now available is over 2.5GW, which is not far off the total capacity for the new Hinkley Point C nuclear power station.

As the use of small-scale solar (the type typically installed on housing or commercial property) has grown demand has fallen. More and more of within-day demand is being met by onsite generation. Consumers can take advantage of the bright and warm summer weather conditions to generate their own solar power, thus reducing the call for demand from the transmission network.

 

maximum demand vs solar

 

The solar impact

The introduction of high volumes of solar generation to the grid – total capacity across all PV sites is over 13GW – has also significantly altered the shape of demand. Consumption across a 24 hour period has flattened in recent years.

The traditional three demand peaks (morning, early afternoon, and evening) have shifted closer to the two peak morning and early evening winter pattern. The ability to generate high levels of embedded – behind the meter – generation during the day in the summer has flattened and at times inverted the typical middle peak. This has left the load shape peaking in early morning (as people wake up) and later in the evening, as people return home from work.

The absolute peak of the day has also shifted in time, moving from early afternoon to the typical early evening peak of 5-5:30pm, again similar to the winter season.

The below graph shows the change over time of the July load shape, which highlights both the reduction in demand and the change in shape, with consumption flattening during daylight hours as a result of behind the meter solar generation dampening network demand. With electricity costs – both wholesale and system – reflecting supply and demand, if consumption is being changed, then it also has an impact on these costs.

 

changing July load shape

 

Stay informed with EIC

Our in-house analysis highlights the impact of onsite generation on load patterns and the extent to which demand can be changed by taking action, and subsequently how behaviours can alter a business’ energy costs.

If you can shift demand away from historical high consumption periods, you can cut your energy costs and make significant savings. One such way to do this is by using smart building controls, such as our IoT-enabled Building Energy Management solution.

To find out more download our brochure, call 01527 511 757, or email info@eic.co.uk.

Reduce your CRC costs through the secondary market

The cost associated with CRC reporting will be replaced from 1 April 2019 with an increase in the Climate Change Levy (CCL), whilst the reporting element of the scheme is to be replaced with Streamlined Energy and Carbon Reporting (SECR).

Participants are required to order, pay, and surrender allowances each compliance year in order to comply with the CRC scheme. There is no further opportunity to purchase forecast allowances at a lower cost, and July 2019 will be the last time ‘Buy to Comply’ allowances will need to be purchased to meet CRC obligations. One allowance equates to one tonne of CO2 reportable, and allowances purchased in the ‘Buy to Comply’ sale will cost more than those sold in the forecast sale at around £1.10 additional cost per allowance.

Allowances can be purchased in government sales of allowances or, where available, through the secondary market.

 
 

What is the secondary market?

CRC allows the trading of allowances through buying or selling to another CRC account holder on the registry. This does not impact the ‘Buy to Comply’ allowance process and doesn’t have set deadlines for purchasing or selling allowances.

The appetite for trading on the secondary market is dependent on the use by other participants and there is no guarantee that buying and selling of allowances will occur when using the notice board.

 
 

Why use the secondary market?

The decrease in fossil fuel use for electricity generation and increase in renewable electricity production has had a positive impact on the emission factor. This has been a favourable outcome for most CRC participants, reducing their emissions and allowance obligations for electricity in CRC reporting.

Organisations that have utilised the lower cost forecast purchase option for CRC reporting have been caught out by the decrease in electricity emission factors for 2017/18 reporting by over forecasting allowances required. This has left some organisations with surplus allowances.

The cost to comply in the 2018/19 Buy to Comply sale has been set at £18.30 per tonne of CO2 reportable.

Purchasing on the CRC secondary market could save your organisation on average approximately £2.18 per tonne of CO2.

 
 

How can EIC help?

EIC can manage the transfer process for you from start to finish*, whether you have surplus allowances to sell or are looking to buy on the secondary market to reduce the cost of complying for the final year of CRC reporting.

The process is simple and if you would like to find out more our dedicated Carbon team is on hand to guide you. You can contact our team on 01527 511 757 or email info@eic.co.uk.

*EIC will not process payment of allowances on behalf of an organisation. Payments for allowances bought or sold on the secondary market are to be made off system between the participants involved. Any additional administration or transaction fees associated with the transfer will need to be pre agreed between the two organisations.

A new era for energy and building management

The building management industry is on a path to converge with IT and, with the rise of the Internet of Things (IoT), a world of opportunities has opened up.

How many of us used Uber to order a taxi, or Air BnB to book accommodation five years ago? New technology isn’t only disrupting the way we live, but also the way we work. In fact, 76% of businesses believe that IoT is critical to their future success.

At EIC the aim is to help businesses reduce their utilities consumption and energy-related costs. And, as IoT connects ever more devices, we’re using cutting-edge solutions to revolutionise how you run your business. In short, thanks to IoT, traditional building management systems (BMS) as we know them are a thing of the past. There’s never been a better time to upgrade your energy management strategy – but how?

We want to transform the way you control, monitor, meter, and manage your energy and water usage, as well as your sites’ critical business systems. To do this, we’ve teamed up with leading tech giants Dell EMC and Intel to launch our IoT-enabled Building Energy Management solution. The partnership unites the technologies needed to integrate a businesses’ critical energy systems with a single, remotely-managed platform. With instant access to actionable data insights, buildings can be managed in real-time.

Through our smart controls solution, you’ll have the power to implement, amend, and manage control strategies on a wide portfolio of sites from the single touch of a button.

 

Together, through IoT controls, we can provide you with; 

  • Full integration. View, manage, and control your energy consumption and your buildings’ critical business systems in one place with a cohesive, joined-up strategy that includes energy, water, security, heating, lighting, access control systems, and point of sale.
  • Real-time data. Access your building’s data 24/7/365, anytime and anywhere, from desktop to smartphone.
  • Actionable insights. Transform your utilities data into useable information, helping reduce your energy consumption, improve energy efficiency, and better control your costs.
  • Simple and quick implementation with minimal disruption. We can set up our equipment in minutes and there’s no need to re-wire. In fact, once we’re set up you can turn off your old systems. 
  • Valuable savings. Cut your operating costs by up to 20%, even on your most efficient buildings. ROI for our solution is typically under 12 months, in an industry where up to five-year paybacks are commonplace.
  • A truly bespoke solution. We can design a platform to connect, configure, and control what you need, specific to your business strategy and requirements.

 

By giving business owners and building managers unprecedented insight into how their buildings are using energy, they can make truly informed decisions about how to reduce their utility bills. Our IoT controls solution will leave you with intelligent buildings and a smarter business, giving you the potential to unlock huge savings, freeing up cash to be invested elsewhere.

For a taster of what our Building Energy Management solution can do for you, download our brochure and start your journey to a better-connected future.