Monday November 4, 2019

The Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy (BEIS) has published a consultation to seek views on proposed targets for the Minimum Energy Efficiency Standard (MEES). Currently MEES make it unlawful to grant new leases to properties with an Energy Performance Certificate rating of F and G.

The Government’s options

The Government has identified two potential trajectories for strengthening the PRS (Private Rented Sector) Regulations. These aim to unlock the economic opportunities of low carbon growth, and deliver important energy and carbon savings:

  • The Government’s preferred route is that all non-domestic privately rented buildings achieve a Minimum Energy Efficiency Standard of a B rating, by 1 April 2030. This is provided the measure (or package of measures) required to reach an EPC ‘B’ proves cost effective.
  • The alternative option is that all non-domestic privately rented buildings reach a ‘C’ rating by 1 April 2030, if cost effective.

In both cases, the Government recognises that not all buildings will be able to reach the required minimum standard. In this instance the Government proposes that landlords can continue to lease their building (from 2030) providing they can prove that the building has reached the highest EPC band that a cost-effective package of measures can deliver.

The impacts

BEIS estimates that using the ‘B’ rating EPC route, an investment of approximately £5 billion up to 2030 is required. The estimated average payback time would be 4-5 years. Their modelling suggests this will translate to £1 billion in bill savings for business in 2030. This would deliver an overall value of £6.1 billion to the UK economy. The annual benefit to businesses by using this option is projected to be approximately double that of the ‘C’ rating EPC.

Regardless of the option chosen, BEIS proposes that existing exemptions will continue to apply. This means that landlords will be required to carry out upgrades that are cost-effective, with an expected payback on energy savings of seven years or less. If the work cannot meet this criteria then landlords are able to register an exemption, valid for five years.

The proposed timescale

The Government has asked whether a single implementation date of 2030 is appropriate for landlords to meet the determined rating. As an alternative it has been suggested that incremental targets leading up to 2030 could be introduced. This would encourage landlords to improve the EPC rating of their buildings over time.

The consultation is expected to close on 7 January 2020.

Stay informed with EIC insights

Our Market Intelligence team keep a close eye on the energy markets and industry updates. For the timeliest updates you can find us on Twitter and LinkedIn. To find out more about our Minimum Energy Efficiency Standard (MEES) solutions click here.

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